As Nadine Dorries confirms an official review, the BBC is bracing itself for a crackdown on its bias.

In an effort to improve the BBC’s impartiality, Nadine Dorries has launched a review of the organisation. 

As Nadine Dorries confirms an official review, the BBC is bracing itself for a crackdown on its bias.

When asked about whether the broadcaster was fulfilling its commitments under the 2017 Royal Charter, Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries said that she was putting up an interim assessment of the broadcaster. The BBC’s severe constitutional obligations are laid forth in the Royal Charter every ten years. 

By ensuring the BBC was “more impartial, more accessible, and more reflective of the views of the British people,” Ms Dorries said this morning.

She said: “The BBC is a world-class broadcaster but one which has to adapt to a rapidly changing landscape just like all broadcasters are.”

“The Government is committed to ensuring the BBC is more impartial, more accessible and more reflective of our country’s variety of viewpoints.”

“This review will build on our recent progress to make the BBC more accountable to those who fund it, level up people’s access to the job opportunities it offers and ensure it continues to work in the best interest of the public.”

“to consider if reforms are needed to help it achieve greater impartiality”.

She has previously criticised the BBC for being too “London-centric” and failing to reflect the opinions of the British people as a whole. 

BBC’s compliance with editorial standards and how it represents viewers from working-class backgrounds will be examined as a part of the mid-term review’s scope. 

Ministers want to make sure the BBC is cost-effective, given that a yearly TV licence costs £159 in the UK. 

Director-general Tim Davie has proposed making adjustments to better the broadcaster’s product for viewers, according to the company. 

When he became the head of the broadcaster in September 2020, he said that increasing the representation of the whole nation was a primary aim.  

BBC Bias Crackdown review launched Nadine Dorries Royal charter Tv License uk politics news links
BBC being probed due to its bias.

At the time, Mr Davie made the following promise: “Overall my guiding principle is that we are a universal public service, a BBC for all, that serves and represents every part of this country.”

“Our focus must be to ensure that we deliver outstanding and unique value to all audiences, those who pay for us and are in effect our customers, in return for their licence fee.”

“To do this we will need to keep reforming the BBC with urgency so that we are trusted, relevant and indispensable in this digital age.”

The corporation said last year that it will relocate 400 posts from London to Birmingham, Leeds, Cardiff, and Glasgow in order to better reflect the opinions of the people of the United Kingdom. 

BBC Bias Crackdown review launched Nadine Dorries Royal charter Tv License uk politics news links
Nadine Dorries cracks down on the BBC blatant bias.

Radio 4’s Today programme will be co-hosted by a presenter outside of London for at least 100 episodes a year, while the flagship news programme Newsnight will now be broadcast from various UK locations during the year. 

The BBC welcomes the Government’s mid-term review, and we plan to “engage fully and constructively,” said the corporation’s chairman, Richard Sharp. 

As Mr Sharp put it, “The mid-term review is built into our Charter. We welcome it and we will engage fully and constructively.

“We look forward to working with Government and Ofcom.”

In the coming months, a separate examination of the BBC licence fee and whether it is the right financial mechanism for the broadcaster in the years to come will be started.

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